Day 25: The Evolution of the American Barn

One of the first projects I did in college considered a claim that we read in a class reading. The author of the reading claimed that the automobile “destroyed farming as a culture… and turned it into another form of industrial production.” However, I didn’t agree with that statement. So I used the American barn to show that even if the face of farming has changed, the culture behind it has not.

The project required us to focus on a specific place, so I needed some pictures from home.

The first picture I would be able to find just by looking out my kitchen window. This would be a picture of our big, red barn that was built in the 1860s. This barn represents agriculture of the past and is the classic symbol of rural America.

oldbarn

To get the second picture, I would need to drive about 3 minutes down the road to my brother’s house. Here I could take a picture of his hog confinement nursery, which was built two years ago. This barn represents the agribusiness of the present and how the face of farming has changed.

new

Despite the fact that the way we farm has changed, my project went on to explain that the culture of this way of life has not changed. I spoke to the facts that the importance of a good work ethic, clear morals and values, and a strong education have always been a part of the farming community and still are to this day.

I’m incredibly grateful that agricultural technologies have advanced as much as they have to improve our production. But I’m even more grateful that the agricultural community has maintained its values even with those changes.

IMG_0632

Don’t forgot about the other 30-Day bloggers!

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